In the footsteps of Galileo

In the footsteps of Galileo

Students and teachers from all over Europe contributed to the foundation – in 1222 - of a University in Padova, intended as “knowledge building itself a home”. Throughout the centuries, Padova provided a protected and rich environment for the progression of science and culture, guaranteeing the academic freedom that scholars were not able to find anywhere else: the famous motto Universa Universis Patavina Libertas means that, in Padova, freedom is universal for all.

Thanks to this distinctive feature, the University of Padova could host a significant number of renowned scientists and teachers, such as Andrea Vesalio, Gianbattista Morgagni, Gabriele Falloppio, Girolamo Fabrici d’Acquapendente, Giacomo Zabarella and Marco Mantua Benavides. Among them was Galileo Galilei, who spent “the best eighteen years of his life” at Padova. Galilei was one of the founding fathers of modern science, most famous for his efforts to free it from the constraints of religion.

Among the alumni were Francesco Guicciardini, Leon Battista Alberti, Tommaso Campanella, Erasmus of Rotterdam, Nicholas Copernicus and William Harvey.

In 1678, for the first time in the world,  the University of Padova released a University degree to a woman, Elena Cornaro Piscopia.

This cultural and scientific perspective led to the foundation of the Galilean School of Higher Education in 2004. The School provides a learning path towards excellence, completing the standard university degrees of Padova with an advanced training, in order to increase the cultural and scientific background of students. 

In the footsteps of Galileo

In the footsteps of Galileo

Students and teachers from all over Europe contributed to the foundation – in 1222 - of a University in Padova, intended as “knowledge building itself a home”. Throughout the centuries, Padova provided a protected and rich environment for the progression of science and culture, guaranteeing the academic freedom that scholars were not able to find anywhere else: the famous motto Universa Universis Patavina Libertas means that, in Padova, freedom is universal for all.

Thanks to this distinctive feature, the University of Padova could host a significant number of renowned scientists and teachers, such as Andrea Vesalio, Gianbattista Morgagni, Gabriele Falloppio, Girolamo Fabrici d’Acquapendente, Giacomo Zabarella and Marco Mantua Benavides. Among them was Galileo Galilei, who spent “the best eighteen years of his life” at Padova. Galilei was one of the founding fathers of modern science, most famous for his efforts to free it from the constraints of religion.

Among the alumni were Francesco Guicciardini, Leon Battista Alberti, Tommaso Campanella, Erasmus of Rotterdam, Nicholas Copernicus and William Harvey.

In 1678, for the first time in the world,  the University of Padova released a University degree to a woman, Elena Cornaro Piscopia.

This cultural and scientific perspective led to the foundation of the Galilean School of Higher Education in 2004. The School provides a learning path towards excellence, completing the standard university degrees of Padova with an advanced training, in order to increase the cultural and scientific background of students.